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Statue of Justice and street sign

Address

Central Criminal Court
Old Bailey, London EC4M 7EH

Contact details

020 7192 2739
ccc.enquiries

Opening hours

Monday to Friday
9.55am to 12.40pm
1.55pm to 3.40pm (last admission)

Bank Holiday Mondays: closed
August: reduced court sitting

The Old Bailey

Known as the Old Bailey, the Central Criminal Court of England and Wales, is one of a number of buildings housing the Crown Court.

Behind its dignified façade the Old Bailey is a centre of intense activity with thousands of people entering the building on a daily basis. As well as judges, counsel, jurors, witnesses and defendants, these include the many staff needed to run the courts and the building.

Parking info and travel links

​​If you are driving to the Court, see our Where to park pages for details.

Nearest tube station: St Paul's
Nearest train station: City Thameslink

The public galleries

Access is free and based on a first come first served basis

  • Seating cannot be reserved under any circumstances
  • Groups, maximum 20 people, need to call in advance

Please note

  • There is no admission for children under 14 and proof of age may be requested by security.
  • Visitors who wish to watch court proceedings from the public galleries are requested to dress appropriately or entry to the court building will be refused.
  • No large bags or rucksacks are allowed in the building, though handbags are acceptable. Also no electronic devices, food or drink are allowed. There are no facilities for the safekeeping of such items available at the entrance to the public galleries.

About the Old Bailey

The City of London Corporation owns and administers the building, as department headed by the Secondary and Under Sheriff. This handles security, maintenance and also deals with administration of the Shrievalty, which includes execution of writs and warrants.

Staff run the courts, headed by the Courts Administrator who administers all the London group of crown centres. The work includes the huge and complicated task of assigning cases to courts, ensuring that there are always cases ready and waiting to be heard, with witnesses, defendants and counsel available

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