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Criminal Lives, 1780-1925: Punishing Old Bailey Convicts

  1. Date:
    11 December 2017 - 16 May 2018
    Venue:
    London Metropolitan Archives
    Location:
    View a map of London Metropolitan Archives
    Time:
    All day
    Cost:
    Free - exhibition, no need to book. Open during normal office hours
    Book by phone:
    020 7332 3851
    Book by email:
    Email us
    Event description:
    ​FREE during normal opening times
    Between 1700 and 1900, Britain stopped punishing the bodies of convicts and increasingly sought to reform their minds. Exile and forced labour in Australia and incarceration in penitentiaries became the dominant modes of punishment. This exhibition uses the collections of LMA to trace the impact of these punishments on convict lives.
    Tags
    History
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Time:
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