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Close up of a London Tramways poster showing Big Ben

 

A unique set of photographs of the construction of Tower Bridge, images of the Great Fire of 1666 and a set of compelling photos of Victorian street life feature in the new version of our ‘Collage – The London Picture Archive’ website which provides free access to over a quarter of a million images of London dating from 1450 to the present day.

The maps, prints, paintings, photographs and films which are available to view are drawn from the collections at London Metropolitan Archives and Guildhall Art Gallery, collectively the largest collection of images of the capital in the world, including over 150,000 historical pictures of London streets.

The new version of the Collage website presents a fascinating glimpse of nearly 600 years of life in the capital. Among the new features of the site, The London Picture Map provides a unique way to access images of buildings and places which no longer exist, presenting a searchable vision of a lost London which allows visitors to view pictures of their neighbourhood from bygone days.

Try it out

The image at the top of the page [Collage reference: 36967] shows part of a London Tramways Poster from 1932. Why not open this image in Collage, where you can see the whole picture, zoom in to see the tinyest detail, and explore similar images.

COLLAGE Search images

​The material on Collage ranges from prints and drawings to maps and photographs. All parts of London (not just the City) are included, as are the adjoining counties.

Recent additions include many images from the Greater London Council (GLC) and London County Council’s (LCC) photographic collection. The collection reflects the work of the LCC, GLC, Survey of London, and other bodies concerned with the built environment of London. We have also recently added photographs by Miles and Kaye of images of the City of London during the First World War.

Please note that Collage itself is NOT comprehensive in coverage of the collections it represents. More visual material is available at London Metropolitan Archives. Please contact us for further information.

Published:
28 March 2012
Last Modified:
28 August 2018

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