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The City of London has a working record of its history stretching back nearly one thousand years, enjoy a rare opportunity to view treasures held in trust for the nation.

General admission is FREE.

Getting here

Located within Guildhall Art Gallery, London EC2V 5AE

The documents on display belong to the collection of the London Metropolitan Archives whose holdings of records, documents, films, photographs and maps take up the equivalent of 100 km (62 miles).

On display

7 January – 27 April 2017: A celebration of the 950th anniversary of the 1067 charter, the oldest item from the City of London Corporation's 100 km of archives.

The charter was given to the City by William the Conqueror soon after he was crowned at Westminster, but before he entered the City of London. It is key to how William won the support of London and how the City itself began to gain its special autonomy.

Written in Old English, the Charter is tiny, less than 16cm x 2cm in size with one of the earliest seal impressions of William I.

For more information see the William Charter page.

Future Exhibitions

  • 29 April – 10 August 2017 a display featuring the Great Parchment Book (Irish estates)

Opening hours

  • Monday 10am - 5pm
  • Tuesday 10am - 5pm
  • Wednesday 10am - 5pm
  • Thursday 10am - 5pm
  • Friday 10am - 5pm
  • Saturday 10am - 5pm
  • Sunday - 12pm - 4pm

Closures

Closures are sometimes required at short notice due to civic or state functions at Guildhall.

Call 020 7332 3700 / textphone 020 7332 3803 for a daily recorded message or for more information.

The City history
  • News
    Explore our history
    Explore Our History

    Unearth 2,000 years of history of the City of London

  • News
    magna carta
    Magna Carta

    The City Corporation owns one of the last remaining copies of the Magna Carta

  • Magna Carta
    Close up Magna Carta

    ​Did you know the City Corporation owns one of the few copies of the Magna Carta in existence today?

    Kept in storage at Guildhall Library and periodically displayed at the Heritage Gallery, the document is widely regarded as one of the finest surviving 13th-century copies.

    Because of its delicate nature, it is not on permanent display.


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