Skip to content

Golders Hill Park Zoo is a small zoo that is home to a number of exotic mammals and birds. The Zoo is open to visitors everyday and is located near the children's play area.

Opening times and travel information

Golders Hill Park Zoo is inside Golders Hill Park and has the same opening and closing times. You can find times and directions to the Park below:

Visit Golders Hill Park

Our animals

The Zoo is home to a wide range of exotic and native species including:

  • Ring-tailed lemurs
  • Scottish wildcats
  • Bennett's wallabies
  • an eagle owl
  • Kookaburras
  • Fallow deer
  • Donkeys
  • Red junglefowl
  • Bantam chickens
  • And more!

The history of the Zoo

  • 1905: Sir Samuel Scott and Master Frank Walker donate deer to the Park
  • 1908: Hon. Lionel Walter Rothschild MP donates two emus, two kangaroos and two rheas
  • 1910: Captain RW Templeton donates a black bear for two years
  • 1916: the British Bee Keepers Association install hives at the Zoo
  • WWI+II: the Zoo's stock is reduced as permission is given for the animals to be killed if their food was unavailable due to rationing
  • 1949: post-war development sees red deer, a white stag, wallabies, rabbits and guinea pigs added to the collection
  • 1965: the Greater London Council take over management of the Zoo and replace its red deer with fallow deer and add Chinese water deer, soy sheep and wallabies to the collection
  • 1986: flamingos, rheas, sarus cranes and several domestic species join the collection
  • 1989: the City of London Corporation takes on management of the Heath, Park and Zoo
  • 2007: the Zoo joins the British and Irish Association of Zoos and Aquariums and ring-tailed lemurs, coati, kookaburras and other animals are added to the collection
  • 2017: a plan to redevelop the Zoo begins

The future of the Zoo

The Zoo will be undergoing a series of changes over the coming years, with our collection will be re-focused to reflect the story of ‘Wildlife in Britain’ and its links to Hampstead Heath.

To accommodate the collection changes, we'll be making improvements to the Zoo's enclosures, enhancing the habitats of the existing enclosures, and building new enclosures to house new additions to the collection.

Following the changes the animals housed within the Zoo will tell the story of ‘Wildlife in Britain’.

Conservation

In the summer months, the Zoo team also spend time surveying areas in the Park to record what wildlife can be seen. In the summer of 2021, we identified 11 native species of native butterfly, nine species of bee, and nine species of dragonflies and damselflies.